COTTON & SISSE | The Space Between

LOUIE PALU | The Void of War

Issue 03 NYPH Special

When I got back to Kandahar Airfield (KAF), the main NATO Base in Southern Afghanistan, west of Kandahar City in the summer of 2008, I wasn’t sure I would have the energy for my next assignment. I had been “on the line” for almost two months now. My next project would be to photograph US Marines in the dreaded Garmsir District in Helmand Province. Luckily, earlier that day when I was with the Canadian Soldiers, I caught what they called the “Montreal Express,” a helicopter ride back from a Forward Operating Base (FOB) to KAF. It was horseshoes for me: better in a helicopter than riding in a vehicle waiting for an IED to blow me sky-high after covering two months of frontline fighting.
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Lucie Awards, Honoree Slideshow | 2009

Issue 06

A tribute to the 2009 Lucie Award Nominees: Fazal Sheikh, Jean-Paul Goude, Gilles Peress, Marvin Newman, Reza, Ara Guler, and Mark Seliger.
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LUIS GONZÁLEZ PALMA | Hierarchies of Intimacy, “Sorrow”

Issue 02

“Sorrow” is the continuation of a larger project, titled Hierarchies of Intimacy, which I began with Graciela De Oliveira in 2004. The titles of the images within the series were created by Graciela De Oliveira and directly relate to each image. Through each title, she attempts to symbolically reflect the experience of absence, in the form of an always-unfulfilled potential, onto relationships with oneself and with the other. I took these photos in austere settings that evince an incomplete world: disturbing and mysterious, but at the same time seductive.
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LUIS GONZALEZ PALMA | Tu/Mi Placer

Issue 03 NYPH Special

You/My Pleasure
This collaboration is a reflection about surreptitious violence, perceived as a form of upbringing and absorbed from childhood. This violence is transformed into an apparently normal manner of living together—the accepted, sublimated forms of coercion associated with low self-esteem and an irrational desire for power that both stem from personal insecurity and can lead to manipulation, regardless of social or educational levels.
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LUKE SHARRETT | Home Away From Home

Issue 09

Holding the highest elected office in the nation has its perks. Entire airports, interstates, and city blocks are shut down to accommodate the President of the United States. Anytime he travels outside the White House compound, a small army of secret service agents, military aides, support staff, and press follow along. Often, the quickest and most secure method of transportation is by motorcade. Shielded by inches-thick reinforced armor and glass, the President leads the way in his limousine. Then come the Secret Service; watching, waiting, always alert.
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MANOLIS BABOUSSIS | Occupations

Issue 03 NYPH Special

My photographs are untitled; they are the product of an action of the gaze: recognition. They juxtapose the experience of the visible world with a topos of my biography.

In the early 1970s, I became interested in the plight of human existence and developed a sensitivity to its influence on architecture and the spaces of psychiatric hospitals. In 1973, pictures were not processed in the form of photo-tableaux.
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MARKEL REDONDO | In God’s Hands

Issue 12

Many Central Americans leave their home countries for better working opportunities, to provide for their families and escape violence. They receive warnings that the journey is dangerous, and life in the U.S. is not easy. Still, they choose to embark on this arduous journey.

Since 2010, I have been documenting the journey of Central American men, women and children while attempting to cross the borders from Honduras to Guatemala through Mexico and into the United States. I have photographed and interviewed victims, survivors, and heroes; meanwhile, I have witnessed the desperation that drives a person to leave his or her family, home, and country in the hope of a better life.
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MARVIN E. NEWMAN | Untitled

Issue 06

I have BEEN A photographeR all my adult life and I love doing it. The act of creativity still moves me more than anything else. When you have truly been creative you know it. There is nothing more satisfying, and making this series of photographs of trees was one of those experiences.
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MIGUEL RIO BRANCO | Tokyo

Issue 07

These images are just some ideas roaming around in my mind. I was looking for contrasts in the city of Tokyo. I believed I could find them there, but my mind kept reminding me of Japanese movies I had seen in the past: Mizoguchi, Kurosawa, and Kobayashi…Japanese architecture, gardens, and the incredible food. Also, the amazing Utamaro, painter of women (who is also the hero of a movie by Mizoguchi) came to mind.
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MONDONGO | The Doll House

Issue 03 NYPH Special

Sometimes my husband tells me I am a tyrannical artist. And there may be some truth in that, because after hours of discussing the conceptual implications of the images we choose, I get tired of talking and all the theoretical digressions make me angry. I prefer to keep quiet and put my energy into working on the painting. The physical encounter with the work is primordial for me. When I am working with my hands, I am conscious of my mind functioning in a different way. I am palpably aware that practicing my technique opens a road to the future for me; it sparks new ideas that I would not arrive at purely through abstract discussion.
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MOVING EAST | James Longley

Issue 08

After a decade spent mostly in Russia I decided I needed to make a film in the Gaza Strip. It was 2001, just after the New Year, and the second Palestinian uprising was well underway. Ariel Sharon was about to be elected Prime Minister of Israel. At the Erez crossing, an IDF soldier looked skeptically at my cameras and press ID, then waved me through into the bone chilling rain and Gaza. It was my first time in the Middle East; it was my first time in a conflict zone. But it was also the start of a chapter of my life which has not yet ended.
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NAHO KUBOTA | Unrevealed

Issue 01

The photographic series "Unrevealed" transforms an unknown organic object into an abstract color patch. The photographs are titled respectively after the prominent primary color in each image. Through this series, the viewers can avoid the process by which they unconsciously associate an image or an object with something already familiar. The images allow the viewers to think about their personal thoughts, such as memory, rather than compelling them to identify the subject of each photograph. By portraying something ordinary as something unfamiliar, the images can change people’s perceptions of what is real.
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OMAR GAMEZ | Stability. Notes on gravity.

Issue 01

The theory of stability of dynamic systems proposed in 1892 by the Russian mathematician Aleksander Lyapunov covers three states of equilibrium: stable, unstable and asymptotically stable. Any of these three possibilities suggest that the origin, the point at which the body stands independently of external supports, is in fact a solution for equilibrium. The body always achieves balance by locating its own center.
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PATRICIA LAY-DORSEY | Falling Into Place

Issue 12

I WAS 45 YEARS OLD when I took my first unexplained fall. Until that cold January day in 1988, I had run marathons, ridden 200-mile weekend bicycle tours with my husband, and had only recently stopped taking modern dance and ballet classes. My body had always done whatever I asked of it until suddenly, it became the most unpredictable part of my life. Eight months after that first fall, I was diagnosed with chronic (primary) progressive Multiple Sclerosis. From that moment on, I saw my body as a stranger.
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PATRICK WEIDMANN | Untitled

Issue 03 NYPH Special

I would like to accentuate the specifics of the photographic medium. Not just take pictures. The main subject is photography itself.

I take pictures of fragments. They are metaphors for what should happen or what should be seen. I want the subjects to disappear behind the idea of being objects, even if they are obsessions. I want to trigger the collusion between the promise of instant happiness and the dark side of death strategies, that which is commercially produced to make us participants in our own end.
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PER-ANDERS PETTERSSON | In Transition

Issue 09

I arrived in South Africa in the spring of 1994 to cover the first historic democratic elections in of the country. Nelson Mandela became the first black president of South Africa. He had been free for four years and had toured the world like a rock star. The election was one of the most significant events in recent history; from the ashes of a repressive, segregated and racist state emerged miraculously a multi-racial nation and one of the greatest success stories on the African continent. 
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RAFAEL FUCHS | I am Amerikan

Issue 04

I am a collector. When I was a kid I used to collect stamps. I have stamps from all over the world.

When I grew up I started collecting memories. I decided to take pictures since I knew that otherwise I’d forget.

I do it, at times obsessively. I am aware of it.

I wish, sometimes, that I were in the moment, Looking, not through the lens, Just enjoying and being amazed and captivated.
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REAL BEAUTY | Jodi Bieber

Issue 08

This new body of work has been inspired by a number of events, primarily by my own maturity. My forties have brought a feeling of more comfort in my own skin than when I was younger, even though my body shape has shifted dramatically. This project is a reaction to a Dove billboard advertising campaign in London showing ordinary women in their underwear advocating and speaking up for real beauty. Advertising campaigns don’t usually draw my attention, but this one did.
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RENA EFFENDI | Pipe Dreams

Issue 08

My first job, at the age of 19, was as a translator for the Azerbaijan International Oil Company, a consortium of some of the world's largest oil producers. This gave me financial independence, as the oil industry was the most lucrative employer for educated youth in Baku. I was considered one of the lucky few—those that managed to benefit from the oil boom. Having gained an inside perspective, I decided to look outward as I began to photograph in 2001, focusing on the oil industry’s effects on ordinary people’s lives in my country.
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REZA | War and Peace

Issue 06

In my travels in war zones, natural disaster areas, places of sorrow and beauty, I have often been reminded of the tale told by Rumi, the 13th-century Persian sage. It is a tale known to many cultures, the tale of villagers who had never seen an elephant and are frightened when one comes near their village. The three men who are sent to examine the beast in total darkness come back with three completely different explanations of what it is. This is because each has only touched one part of the creature – an ear, a leg, its trunk – and mistakenly believes the single part is the whole of the animal. The different viewpoints lead to deep divisions in the community.
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RICHARD MOSSE | Theatre of War

Issue 05

Theatre of War was shot from the columned poolside terraces and French windows of Uday Hussein's palace in the Jebel Makhoul mountain range in central Iraq. Uday's father, Saddam, and his brother, Qusay, had their own separate palaces in this complex overlooking the River Tigris.

Destroyed by U.S. Airforce JDAM bombing in 2003, these spectacular ruins become an epic stage for US soldiers to gesticulate and exhibit themselves self-consciously within the theatre of war.
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RUTH KAPLAN | Some Kind of Devine

Issue 10

I AM NOT SURE WHAT INITIALLY LED ME to photograph churches since my interest in religion has always been minimal. My father had a feeling for religion and tradition which was deep in his core, and meaningful and enriching to his life. My mother would observe the holidays, but lived as a practical, social woman, rooted in the day-to-day with no interest in transcendence. Her father and two brothers were killed in the Holocaust and her mother had died a few years earlier. After the Nazis came into power in Lithuania, she spent the war in the concentration camp Stutthof, as part of the slave labour forces. Though they believed in tradition, my parents never imposed religious views on my sister or me.
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SAM BARZILAY | [these things were transacted] in silence

Issue 01

wait.

in silence
dwell in silence. anticipate
die in silence.
suffocate


silence is repression; Iwazaru, speak no evil.
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SARA ROITMAN | Evident-Invisible

Issue 03 NYPH Special

EvidentInvisible is a visual metaphor about illegal immigration and human trafficking as a physical and commercial border between humanity and the market.

In developing this work, I used an x-ray machine, which we are all familiar with from airports, in combination with a digital camera. I created scenarios that allude to the dream the immigrant pursues through a journey with an uncertain destination, a journey without solid ground.
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SEBA KURTIS | Stateless

Issue 03 NYPH Special

I had to leave my hometown for economic reasons. According to the system I was stateless and without permission to stay in Europe. When you face deportation, you realize that everything you have can disappear in just one day. The UN Declaration of Human Rights states that everyone has the right to leave his or her own country. However, this well-intentioned governmental principle disregards the individual, as each state has its own conditional terms. These systems maintain the right to decide whether people can stay or not based on such superficial factors as place of birth.
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SHELBY LEE ADAMS | ­Altered Mountain: Portraits of the Holler Dwellers

Issue 2

Growing up in the mountains of Eastern Kentucky I remember my grandfathers talking about the depression era and how difficult it was. They were descendants of the original Holler Dwellers that settled this land. They both remembered men coming around buying up mineral rights with contracts for what was under the land, and for five cents an acre, the farmers sold it to them. Underground deep coal mining was popular in the 1920s and ‘30s and they used ponies and sleds to pull the coal out of the ground. No one saw any harm then. No one suspected that this was an organized assault on several southern states.
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SHRINES: PUBLIC WEAPONS IN AMERICA | Paul Shambroom

Issue 08

What happens to weapons of war when they are no longer useful for their original purposes? Those that are not scrapped are often given second lives in the public sphere, mounted in places of honor in communities across the United States. Town squares, city parks, armories, Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion posts display retired cannons, tanks and aircraft from past American conflicts.
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SIMON ROBERTS | We English

Issue 07

I was born in 1974 in a South London suburb. My mother, a Northerner from Cleator Moor in Cumbria, met my London-born father while they were both working in the capital. My formative years were spent in Oxted, a provincial town in Surrey’s commuter belt. Holidays were often spent walking in the Lake District, usually in the rain, or visiting my grandparents in Angmering-on-Sea, a retirement town on the South Coast. My memories of holidays are infused with very particular landscapes: the lush greenness around Ennerdale Water, or the flint-grey skies and pebbles of Angmering’s beaches.
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SLAVA MOGUTIN | Environmental Pictures

Issue 04

I took my best pictures while traveling. That is when I felt most inspired, free and alive, sometimes living out of my suitcase for months at a time, like a nomad with no specific goal in mind other than a constant change of settings and escape from the boring daily routine, schedule, regiment… And what a reward it is to come back home with a bagful of shot film! The moment of sharing your impressions and memories can be just as exciting as the journey itself.

I might have some gypsy blood in my genes: my Dad couldn’t settle in one place for more than a couple of years, and throughout my childhood, my family was constantly moving around Russia from one corner of the country to another. Taking advantage of his job as a newspaper journalist, my father crisscrossed the mammoth Soviet empire and even traveled as far as Mongolia and Bulgaria.
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STEPHEN CROWLEY | Voices of Afghanistan

Issue 11

I SPOTTED MY FIRST STREET PHOTOGRAPHER, Meera Jan, in a market outside an Afghan refugee camp in Peshawar, Pakistan. I sat for a portrait, watched him work and then asked if I could rent his camera.

The pictures of the barber and vendors at the bazaar along the edge of the Nasir Bagh refugee camp in Peshawar, are a reflection of the effects of jet lag, culture shock and my first impressions of the region. It was one of the most exhilarating and demanding few hours I have spent as a photographer.
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SUZANNE OPTON | Soldier + Citizen

Issue 01

The Soldier photographs take a serious look at the faces of active-duty American soldiers and consider the impact of war on their lives and the lives of those dear to them. Soldiers are traditionally portrayed as heroic and of course that is what we want them to be, but in making these photographs, I wanted to look beyond the heroics, the glamour, and bravado of the military. I wanted to present a quiet look at the individual behind the uniform.
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THE BLENHEIM OAKS | Simon Norfolk

Issue 08

Blenheim Palace near Oxford—one of the greatest of England's stately homes—was a gift from a grateful nation to a General, John Churchill, First Duke of Marlborough, for his victories in battle. In William Fordice Mavor's New Description of Blenheim, a contemporary guidebook to the palace and its gardens, the extraordinary suggestion is made that the original layout for the planting of the oaks imitated the disposition of the troops at the beginning of the Battle of Blenheim on August 13, 1704. Just think: a battlefield, laid out in the heart of England in a massive leafy reminder of a faraway military conquest!
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The Envision Foundation Presents: Eyes and Angles

Issue 12

Students from the High School of World Cultures in the Bronx took part in a 5 month long program run by the Envision Foundation for Photography and Digital Media.

By recording their everyday life, these teenage artists reflect on the role of self within the core of the family, school and community that they have settled in. Their images explore questions of connection and isolation that arise when making a home in a new country.
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THE PARADE | Nadav Kander

Issue 08

The Parade is the name of a quiet coastal road in South East England.

Stretching for approximately two miles, the 150 or so houses that line one side of the road all share uninterrupted views of the sea from the front, whilst from behind they are overshadowed by Dungeness, the oldest nuclear power station in England. Contained within the seemingly private space of their own homes, we watch people performing domestic actions that are not remarkable, nor individual but similar and universal—for me they reveal so much about ourselves.
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THOMAS LEKFELDT | A Star in the Sky

Issue 04

Vibe’s father, Michael, often said that he would catch the stars in the sky for Vibe if she asked him to. Now Michael tells her sister that Vibe herself has become one of the stars in the sky. This is a story of childhood cancer. A story of how a brain tumor slowly but surely killed a little girl. At the same time it is a story about a dear friend of mine, little Vibe, the girl with the tumor. During the year that I worked on this story I became very close with her family, but I never left my camera in my bag or at home. When I sat drinking coffee with Vibe’s father, Michael, the camera lay on the table. When I drove down to get pizzas for dinner together with Vibe’s sister, Laerke, I had the camera with me in the car. Even when I became a friend I was still a photographer.
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TIA LESSIN & CARL DEAL | Trouble the Water

Issue V

"What I got, I've been saving it, 'cause I don't want to give it to nobody local. This needs to be worldwide. Cause all the footage I've seen on TV, nobody got what I got. I got right there in the hurricane."

This is how Kimberly Rivers Roberts introduced herself to us, two documentary filmmakers from New York City, when we met at a Red Cross shelter in Central Louisiana two weeks after Hurricane Katrina. She and her husband Scott had just survived the flooding of their city; the huddled in the attic of their two-story home and brought thirty friends and neighbors to safety.
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TIM HETHERINGTON | Restrepo

Issue 10

Outpost Restrepo lay at the furthest point of American control in Afghanistan’s unruly Korengal Valley. It clung to the rugged mountainside, protected on one side by a steep rock wall and commanding view and was manned by the men of Second Platoon, Battle Company of the 173rd Airborne. I arrived in the valley with the author Sebastian Junger in September 2007, on assignment for Vanity Fair while the world’s gaze was still firmly centered on events in Iraq.
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TIM MANTOANI | Behind Photographs

Issue 06

I began this series in December of 2006 in San Francisco. I had grown up in the Bay Area and I was home visiting my parents for the holidays. I took a day to rent a 20 x 24 Polaroid camera. I had seen the camera advertised for rent and had come to a point in my photographic career when I was thirsting to get back to working with a more tactile process. Being a commercial shooter in San Diego, my business had, like most, become nearly 100% digital. My background was in large-format photography, and I shot much of my early portrait work on 4-x-5-inch film. The process seemed more special than working in 35mm digital.
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VANÉ RUSSO | Special Violence

Issue 01

In my artwork I try to explore and explode the boundaries between painting and sculpture, figuration and abstraction, western portraiture and African iconography.

I cover carefully manipulated found objects with my own gesture of abstract expressionism. With vibrant color and composition, I paint portraits of those objects, which seem to burst, melt and blur into plastic particulars. For this project, I chose to work with an out-dated, partially torn apart computer.

Born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, I was surrounded by the chaos of bidonvilles in constant expansion, dilapidation, and deconstruction.
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VENETIA DEARDEN | Untitled

Issue 03 NYPH Special

My passion and curiosity for Somerset have been fuelled by my long-time connection, and recent disconnection with this area of the West Country. I grew up in Somerset and my family still lives there. I used to roam for miles on horseback through the fields, woodlands, and muddy bridle paths, and here I inherited a sense of freedom and possibility. This personal photographic journey within the boundaries of my homeland is testament to my love of Somerset.
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