RENA EFFENDI | Pipe Dreams

FANNY GRIFFITHS FERRATO | Untitled

Issue 01

Many people mistakenly view the Middle East as dangerous and primitive. These individuals assume that the landscape is mainly desert, women must cover themselves in public, and all men wear turbans. However, people in the West often do not realize that there is more to the Middle East. My images portray a different side to the generally perceived concepts of Syria. I have tried to capture the ordinary day-to-day existence of Syrians.
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FAZAL SHEIKH | The Circle

Issue 06

VrindAvan, in northern India, is a place of exile for widows who have been put out onto the streets by their families because of superstitions that the women were responsible for their husbands’ deaths. When I first visited the small town, I knew little about the circumstances that had brought them there, where they lived, or their extreme poverty. In the following years I met some of them and listened to their stories of hardship, religious devotion and endurance.
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FERIT KUYAS | Reflections on Chongqing

Issue 10

MY FIRST VISIT TO CHINA was in 1997 when I went to photograph the “World Elevator” fair in Shanghai. From that moment, I felt at home in China. One year later in September 1998, I met my future wife. When we went to visit her family, I saw Chongqing for the first time. This was the starting point for City of Ambition. My first impression of Chongqing was a heat and brightness so strong that it hurt my eyes. My wife and I were only able to visit my in-laws in the city during summers, which are hot and humid. I was deeply impressed by the drama of the place itself: three dimensional, hilly, very busy, construction sites everywhere, and two huge rivers blending in the middle. I immediately knew I would photograph there.
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FOTOVISURA PAVILION | Dia

Issue 12

Dia Exhibition unites eight photographers who documented New York’s Puerto Rican communities from the Lower East Side to the South Bronx during the 1960′s to 1980s. This exhibition features photographers Frank Espada, David González, Ricky Flores, Perla de León, Joe Conzo, Pablo Delano, Francisco Reyes II and Máximo Colón.
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FOTOVISURA PAVILION | E-cite

Issue 12

E-cite, a slide show presentation featuring a selection of five online blogs and magazines — New York Times Lens Blog, Time Magazine Lightbox, NPR Picture Show Blog, PDN Photo of the Day Blog & Visura Magazine—that have inspired the FotoVisura community. In a collaborative effort, each of these forums has created a unique presentation to represent their respective platforms.
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FOTOVISURA PAVILION | In Love and War

Issue 12

In Love and War exhibition reflects on the fragility of human life, in the hopes of bringing the viewer to a place of compassion and solicitude. This exhibition—featuring photographers Milagros de la Torre, Henry Jacobson, Richard Mosse, Jessica Hines, Justin Maxon and Grant Worth—was part of The FotoVisura Pavilion—sponsored by The Viso Lizardi Family—during the 2011 New York Photo Festival.
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FRANCK VOGEL | Zeru, Zeru: Being Albino in Tanzania

Issue 10

AROUND LAKE VICTORIA, Tanzania, evil acts are driven by the belief that albino body parts possess magical powers, which bring wealth if used in potions produced by local witchdoctors. Most clients are rich businessmen, impatient to extract more gold from their mines, or politicians, eager to be elected into office. Since 2007, official reports indicate that over 54 people with albinism have been brutally murdered; their body parts hacked off and sold for large amounts of money: $2,000 for a leg or an arm, and $10,000 for a whole albino body.
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GERD LUDWIG | Moscow Never Sleeps

Issue 08

My personal connection with Russia had already begun, when I was a young child growing up in Germany after World War II. In the darkness of our cramped, post-war space that served as bedroom, kitchen and living room all in one, I would listen to the sad, soothing voice of my father as he conjured up images of endless winter landscapes; of soldiers battling their way through snowstorms; and of people hiding from them in stables and barns.
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GRAHAM LETORNEY | Brown’s Nightmare

Issue 05

Kevon Brown was hospitalized after he had allegedly been beaten by police officers on the night of Friday, August 14, 2009. I arrived moments later as he was recovering from a seizure the reported beating had induced. I tell this story as his neighbor. For me, doing so represents both a need to react and a need to wave a red flag. The first step toward understanding the events of that Friday night is to listen to Kevon’s interview (above). This conversation was recorded early Tuesday morning, August 18, twenty feet from where the incident occurred on Lenox Road, between Flatbush and Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn. The morning of the interview was warm and unusually calm.
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GRAHAM LETORNEY | March 16

Issue 01

This account starts on March 16 in the valley of Cuzco, Peru. The small city was dry and exhausting with a piercing sun over arid mountains—it was quiet and clean except for a thick dust that blew in, covering everything at once. Then, moments later the dust blew away, leaving things as they were. On March 17 I began looking for signs of Cuzco's legacy. Before its conquest by the Spanish, Cuzco was home to the Incas. Now it is home to an Andean culture held back by five hundred years of Spanish rule; somewhere the condor and the bull were wrestling for identity.
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GRANT WORTH | Look Who’s Coming After Dinner

Issue 03 NYPH Special

I created Guess Who’s Coming After Dinner in March through October of 2008. This was a stressful period of time, both globally and personally and a feeling of anxiety and adjustment pervaded. There was a sense that something old was dying and that it was about to be replaced. The current administration was coming to a close, its successor to be determined. I was entering my twenty-ninth year of life on Earth. Astrologically known as “Saturn’s Return,” this is a point in which a person crosses over a major threshold into the next stage of life. There seemed to be a rebirth just over the horizon. The world and my own consciousness were about to reveal the beginnings of whatever was coming next.
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HAMID RAHMANIAN | The Glass House

Issue 01

Directed by Hamid Rahmanian
Produced by Melissa Hibbard
Documentary, 92 minutes, ©2008
A production of Fictionville Studio, in Association with Sundance Channel

The fringes of Iranian society can be a lonely place, especially if you are a teenage girl with few resources to fall back on. The Glass House follows four girls striving to pull themselves out from the margins of society by attending a one-of-a-kind rehabilitation center in uptown Tehran.
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HENRY HORENSTEIN | Show

Issue 09

Over the years I’ve photographed many different types of subjects, including animals and the human form. But I’ve always returned to my roots as a documentary photographer. More than anything, I like a good story. And I try to tell one in a direct way, with humor and a punch line if possible. With this in mind, I have photographed country musicians in Nashville, my family and friends in Massachusetts, horse racing at Saratoga, nightlife in Buenos Aires, old highways everywhere, everyone in Cajun, Louisiana, South American baseball, camel breeding in Dubai, tri-racial families in Maryland, and much, much more.
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HENRY JACOBSON | Communiqué

Issue 12

I recently had a discussion about evolution. I argued that the next stage in human evolution was in the brain, in how it functions, and most importantly, how it communicates. I suggested that this shift would be rapid, fueled by advances in communication technology. It so happens that this debate took place after watching David Fincher’s the social network, in which the great Justin Timberlake utters a cocaine-fueled vision of the present/future; We lived on farms, then we lived in cities, and now we're going to live on the Internet.
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HIROSHI WATANABLE | Suo Sarumawashi

Issue 05

Monkey dancing, known as Sarumawashi in Japanese, evolved over 1,000 years, beginning as a religious ritual to protect warriors’ horses, and growing into a form of festival entertainment performed on city streets, in temples, and at imperial courts across the country.

A group of culturally conscious individuals brought the art form back from the brink of extinction; Sarumawashi survives today, alongside Noh and Kabuki, as one of Japan’s oldest and most traditional art forms.
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Int’l Photography Awards Tribute | 2009

Issue 06

Featuring Nominees for the 2009: International Photographer of the Year, Deeper Perspective Award, and Discovery of the Year
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JAMES KNIGHT-SMITH | A Series of Moments

Issue 6

I have often stood on the coast, looked out at the ocean in all weather conditions, and felt a great sense of calm. I have never asked myself why. I just know that water is incredibly relaxing to me. I have always wanted to capture this feeling in art and I struggled with this idea for a long time, first in drawings and later in photographs. It was by pure chance that one day last year I finally captured exactly what I wanted. I have worked on perfecting that style ever since.
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JAMES WHITLOW DELANO | Selling Spring

Issue 09

Selling Spring, or Baishun in Japanese, reflects age-old attitudes towards prostitution, a form of servitude; it is simply impossible to make generalizations about this subject. Usually, the deeper the poverty, the higher the likelihood young women, and sometimes young men, will wind up in this dangerous profession.  Quite often they are coerced or betrayed by a perceived friend or even a relative in whom misplaced trust results in a form of bondage, though this is not always the case. Even in Thailand, which has made great economic strides over the last thirty years, prostitution is still prevalent, and Patpong and Pattaya are still synonymous with the sex industry.
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JAN BANNING | Looking for a Hidden Past

Issue 12

I SOMETIMES WONDER, why do people do the things they do. Specifically, why did I become interested in focusing on wartime subjects when I was born and raised in times of peace?

My parents were born during the early 1920’s in the Dutch East Indies, a colony that became modern Indonesia following World War II. My mother was sixteen and my father was twenty years old when the War began, which abruptly shattered their happy and prosperous youth, leaving an indelible impression.
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JEFF DOJILLO | The Romance of Mourning

Issue 11

I WAS BORN ON JUNE 9th, 1979. I am the youngest of three children and the product of Filipino immigrants. I grew up in the greater Los Angeles area in a Roman Catholic family raised largely by my sisters and my mother.

Religion has played a large part in my life and upbringing. It has been a source of comfort and a time for reflection. Like many Filipinos, I adopted the value structure dictated by Catholicism.
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JENN ACKERMAN | Trapped

Issue 13

"Trapped" portrays the life and conditions of the prisoners with mental illness at the Kentucky State Reformatory. My hope is that this long term and ongoing project triggers a dialogue not only about prison reform but the mental health crisis in America.
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JESSICA HINES | My Brother’s War

Issue 11

IT WAS IN 1967, during the Viet Nam War, that my brother, Gary, was drafted into the US Army. The Viet Nam War, a Cold War Conflict, was occurring not only in Viet Nam, but also in Laos and Cambodia; it lasted from November 1st, 1955, until May 15th, 1975. When vacancies in the US armed forces could not be filled voluntarily between 1962 and 1973, American men were drafted. It has been said that by 1967, almost half of the enlisted men were draftees. This was the case with my brother.
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JING QUEK | Jingapore

Issue 01

Jingapore is a series of work exploring the urban landscape, its architecture, and the relationships between man and structure.

Portraying a state of nudity or partial nudity, Jingapore attempts to negotiate a return to a primal connection between man and that which is manmade, while at the same time testing the boundaries of acceptable social behavior in an urban landscape.
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JOAN LIFTIN | Runaway

Issue 07

When I was growing up in Brooklyn my aunts would ask me what I wanted to be when I grew up. A runaway, I would say. I’d like to hit the road.

I knew all about hitting the road . I’d seen movies in which spunky young women would walk, hitch, ride the rails across the country having adventures and meeting lovable scoundrels who had been places and seen things.
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JOANNA MURRAY | Student Focus

Issue 02

Photos by Mapplethorpe House Residents

When I decided to volunteer at Beth Israel Hospital in New York City, I pictured myself in a candy-striper uniform, playing games with the elderly or reading stories to the young. In a conversation with the Volunteer Coordinator, I had the opportunity to explain my newfound passion for art therapy and psychology, my love of photography, and my desire to connect with people. She asked me if I had heard of Robert Mapplethorpe, a renowned photographer who died of Aids. This one question led me to create a unique and meaningful photography project that until this moment, I had never thought possible.
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JOHN COMERFORD | Icons Among Us

Issue 05

Seven years of my life were defined in a single night in 1983, when I snuck out of boarding school to attend a Grateful Dead concert on a crisp fall afternoon. That performance sent me in a direction that would carry me to the very heart of improvisational American music.

The high wire act of Jerry Garcia’s improvisational rock guitar was a gateway to other types of “in the moment” virtuoso musicianship.
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JOHN SEVIGNY | El Muerto Pare El Santo

Issue 07

This collection of photographs represents the culmination of a complex web of influences including Baroque painting in Italy and Spain; my Afro-Caribbean faith; my own, sometimes difficult character; and my memories of my father, who died more than five years ago. I came to photography by way of painting, in particular Los Borrachos (1629) by the legendary Spanish Baroque painter Diego Velazquez. I had always taken pictures; I made my first black-and-white darkroom print when I was 12.
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JONI STERNBACH | SurfLand

Issue 03 NYPH Special

The worldwide community of surfers, which is the subject of my tintype portraits called SurfLand, forms a subculture that spans continents, class, age, and gender. My work has taken me to the prized surfing beaches of America’s East and West coasts and my photographs have become a compilation of people’s diversity.
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JOSEPH RODRIGUEZ | Personal Violence

Issue 10

I began photographing gangs in Los Angeles in 1992. I saw Los Angeles as the postmodern wild west, a land governed by the gun. It was an uncontrolled and scary place, a land of dreams and beauty, playing by its own rules. In 1993, I continued photographing gang life in East Los Angeles. My aim was to get to the core of violence in America, not just the physical violence against one another, but also the quiet violence of letting families fall apart, unemployment, our educational system, and the violence of segregation and isolation.
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JOSHUA LUTZ | Am(star)dam

Issue 8

Windmills from the roof of an abandoned building continue forever into the distance. Water quietly flows even through the smallest towns surrounding the city. In some areas the canals are still frozen, but the ice is far too thin to support the would-be skaters quietly sitting on a bench. A few weeks after my son Hudson was born, unsure of what to expect, we wrapped him up and headed from New York to Amsterdam. I was commissioned to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Henry Hudson leaving Amsterdam for New York; somehow this task of getting everything through security seemed far more daunting than anything Henry Hudson could have ever encountered.
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JULIAN FAULHABER | Lowdensitypolyethylene

Issue 02

While studying photography, I assisted several still life and fashion photographers who were shooting for commercials. The agencies clearly emphasized their aesthetic interests: life, trends, purity. This was not new to me, but these aspects sparked my interest in the construction of a lifestyle and in the appearance of buildings and their interiors. I started to photograph nightclubs, loading docks, shopping complexes, sports arenas, and apartments at their moment of completion.
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JURAJ LIPSHER | Body Shops

Issue 03 NYPH Special

We are pleased with our ability to mutate human bodies from weak to strong, from ugly to beautiful, from aroused to slackened, from fat to lean. We build chambers for these tasks and we fit them with machinery and apparatus and paraphernalia and equipment and gear. A child is born, a carnal need is assuaged, a sagging breast is lifted, a man dies. We stand ready, 24/7, our polished tools poised. We are like medieval alchemists working on our opus magnum, converting blemished mortals into immaculate angels, our brightly lit laboratories humming silently, awaiting the next transmutation. Standing in such rooms, I try to push my gaze beneath the stainless steel surfaces to find some answers despite the glare of fluorescent lamps.
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KASHMIR | Andy Spyra

Issue 06

I first came to Kashmir in the spring of 2007, at the end of a motorcycle trip across India. Instantly, I simply fell in love with the people, the light and the atmosphere of this remote part of the world.

But as much as I love it, I dislike the valley's political situation.
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KATIE ORLINSKY | Libya

Issue 12

Many people don’t know I was there with Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros on the day we lost them. I wasn’t physically injured—not a scratch. I think the journalists at the hospital all made the decision to take my name out of their stories, because one of the things I blurted out when I returned to the hospital was that my parents didn’t know I was there.

The unrest in Libya began in mid-February and quickly escalated into a people’s revolt that left thousands dead. During the February fighting, protestors looted most of Gaddafi’s military bases in the east of the country. Although some of what was happening was obviously inspired by Egypt, the fact that so many young men carried Kalashnikov rifles and wore mismatched military garb made the scene uniquely Libyan.
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KEN VAN SICKLE | Second Site

Issue 07

Most photographers, by grace of several kinds of mistakes, discover double exposures on their contact sheets. They are mostly annoyed or distressed that the error spoiled the photo they were after. Some, including myself, find them to be fascinating.

In 1959, I purposely made some double exposures. With the old C-model Leica rangefinder cameras, one could reset the shutter without advancing the film.
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KERRY MANSFIELD | Aftermath

Issue 13

When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, I was 31 years old. This was 7 years ago.

Today, women in their 30’s are the fastest growing group of people with breast cancer in the country. Although it feels like a lifetime has passed since I received treatment, I continue to be haunted by the aftermath of the surgeries, countless combinations of drugs and radical emotional upheavals. The cancer may have left my body, however, its echo never has.
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LANA SLEZIC | A Window Inside

Issue 09

There is no room for love in Afghanistan, said a young teenage girl as we sipped tea in the sitting room of her family’s Kabul apartment. She said this as if it were true, had been for years, for as long as she could remember. Not in that moment, but in the twilight of that evening and for several years after, her remark caused me to reflect on the kind of space that love can consume.
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LARRY FINK | The Beats

Issue 07

Imagine the years, which have passed between these pictures and now. Here I am, graying, experienced, with hope and strain and some fame; with the Octopus, its social tentacles flailing around themselves; the adult that I am, as convoluted as any adult is…through long streets of gain and short bursts of pain. How many cows can one milk in a day?
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LAUREN GREENFIELD | Deconstructing Fashion

Issue 08

Fashion has been a recurring theme in my photography, weaving itself through my stories and pictures in conscious and unconscious ways. When I began my career as a documentarian, I did not intentionally pursue fashion as a discreet focus. I photographed youth culture and studied gender and body image. In that context, fashion was always an integral part of the narratives’ fabric. I photographed girls and women across the world as they navigated their respective social pressures, and struggled to define their individuality.
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LISA ELMALEH | Rooted

Issue 01

The keys to my first car were a means of escape. I was free to drive to the ends of the earth, to be alone in nature. This need to be isolated seemed a primal instinct. Since my late teens, I have been taking solitary road trips, seeking to lose myself along back roads, and finding comfort in the vastness of my natural surroundings. “It is a surprising and memorable, as well as valuable, experience to be lost in the woods any time,” wrote Thoreau, “…and not till we are completely lost, or turned round, - for a man needs only to be turned round once with his eyes shut in this world to be lost, - do we appreciate the vastness and strangeness of Nature.”
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